Entries in wholesale markets (18)

Tuesday
Jun282016

ISO-NE submits comments to US Department of Energy on 2016 Quadrennial Energy Review

ISO highlights importance of efficient wholesale markets; notes that additional energy infrastructure is needed to maintain reliability and meet regional environmental goals

On June 28, Gordon van Welie, President & CEO of ISO New England, submitted comments to the US Department of Energy (DOE) as it prepares to write the second iteration (“Version 1.2”) of its Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). For the 2016 QER, the DOE is focusing on the entirety of the electric system in the United States and North America from bulk power generation to end user.

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Thursday
Jun232016

In brief: ISO-NE publishes markets and grid profile summaries

Putting Markets to Work for New England is a one-sheet summary of the key principles that shaped the region’s wholesale electricity markets and explains the main functions of the various markets. The document highlights the resource transformation underway in New England, the competitiveness of the region’s markets, the role of the capacity market, and the interactions between wholesale markets and public policy requirements. The New England Power Grid 2015–2016 Profile is a one-sheet summary of key facts and figures on the region’s demand growth, resource mix, transmission development, and wholesale electricity prices. Download them today! Also check out the Key Grid and Market Stats webpages for background and supplementary information.

Friday
Jun172016

ISO-NE’s Wholesale Markets Project Plan now issued biannually; download the latest edition 

ISO New England prepares an Annual Work Plan (AWP) that outlines major priorities and activities for a 21-month period designed to improve existing ISO systems, practices, and services to New England. It’s published in the fall and updated in the spring. The AWP contains details on expected timelines and objectives for planning, operations, markets, and capital projects. The Wholesale Markets Project Plan (WMPP) provides a biannual update of the market-related activities described in the AWP as well as updates on additional market-related activities pursued by the ISO. It’s published in summer and winter. Learn more and access the June edition of the WMPP at http://www.iso-ne.com/wmpp.

Thursday
May262016

ISO-NE’s wholesale electricity and capacity markets were competitive in 2015

The 2015 Annual Markets Report, issued by the Internal Market Monitor at ISO New England, concluded that New England’s wholesale power markets were competitive in 2015. The report found that average prices for both natural gas and wholesale electricity were the lowest since 2012. The average wholesale price for electric energy was $41 per megawatt-hour, and the total value of the region’s energy market was $5.9 billion.

View the press release and full report.

Thursday
Apr212016

Winter 2015/2016 recap: New England power system performed well and prices remained low

Compared to winters past, the winter of 2015-2016 featured above-average temperatures and a brief cold snap in February. Many in the region have called it the “the winter that wasn’t.”

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this winter was the warmest on record in the US. The average temperature in the lower 48 states was 36.8°F, which is 4.6°F above the 20th-century average. That beats the previous record of 36.5 degrees set in the winter of 1999-2000.

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Wednesday
Mar232016

ISO-NE report on market price formation highlights complexity of issue, regional improvements

Uplift costs are just 1–2% of the total energy market value in New England

On March 4, ISO New England filed its responses to Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) questions on price formation in wholesale electricity markets. The ISO report includes detailed answers to the technical, complex issues raised by FERC and highlights the significant strides made regionally to achieve pricing that accurately and transparently signals the costs of operating New England’s power system.

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