Entries in renewable resources (57)

Friday
Oct262018

ISO-NE CEO gets “revved” up over the hybrid grid at Renewable Energy Vermont (REV) conference in Burlington

The New England electric grid is evolving in two fundamental ways, according to ISO New England CEO Gordon van Welie. The grid is shifting from the use of fossil fuels to generate electricity to cleaner resources and from central power plants to distributed generation. This change is creating a massive and exciting engineering and market design challenge, van Welie said.

van Welie shared this observation, and many others, during a keynote address at the Renewable Energy Vermont (REV) conference in Burlington, Vermont, on October 18. During his address to approximately 500 people, van Welie discussed the journey that New England is on in terms of energy policy, and the role of the ISO in it.

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Thursday
May032018

A regional first: New Englanders used less grid electricity midday than while they were sleeping on April 21

Solar power also pushes past 2,300 megawatts (MW) for first time

On Saturday, April 21, 2018, the right combination of sunshine and mild weather led to light consumer demand on the high-voltage electric power system, coupled with record-high output from the more than 130,000 solar power installations in the region. The result was that midday grid demand dipped below overnight demand for the first time ever in New England.

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Wednesday
Apr252018

Winter 2017/2018 recap: Historic cold snap reinforces findings in Operational Fuel-Security Analysis

Weather always plays a crucial role in how ISO New England operates the region's power grid, and that was certainly the case as New England faced a historic two-week cold snap in late December and early January that sent temperatures plunging and nearly pushed the bulk power system to the brink.

"The cold temperatures, together with winter storms and other complicating factors, led to some of the most challenging conditions our system operators have ever had to navigate," said Peter Brandien, ISO New England's vice president for system operations.

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Thursday
Apr192018

Earth Day 2018: Setting regional solar and wind power records in New England

This Earth Day (Sunday, April 22)—or any day—you can learn about the role that renewables and other clean-energy resources are playing in the region by visiting ISO New England’s Key Grid and Market Stats and Grid in Transition webpages. Following are some snapshots of where the region stands, with links to learn more.

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Monday
Mar192018

Staying a Step Ahead: A look inside ISO-NE and the region’s changing power system

Have you ever wondered what it’s like in ISO New England’s control room? Or how the ISO fits into the region’s energy landscape? Staying a Step Ahead, released March 19, takes you inside the ISO, showcasing how the grid operator keeps the lights on across New England – today and in the future. Shot at the ISO offices and throughout New England, the video looks at the transformation occurring in New England, as the region transitions from a grid powered by oil and coal plants to one more reliant on renewable energy.

Learn more about the ISO’s three critical roles, and read about New England’s power system in the 2018 Regional Electricity Outlook.

Monday
Mar122018

FERC issues order accepting CASPR revisions to Forward Capacity Market

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued an order on March 9, 2018, accepting ISO New England’s CASPR proposal in its entirety and rejecting all of the arguments raised in protests. The Commission notes that out-of-market state revenues can result in building more capacity than a region needs, overpayment by consumers for capacity, inefficiently low capacity market prices and the erosion of investor confidence. The Commission concludes that the CASPR proposal, along with the New England region’s minimum offer price rules (MOPR), appropriately addresses the issues associated with out-of-market state revenues while ensuring that the overall capacity market can continue to attract and maintain appropriate levels of new resource investment.

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