Tuesday
Oct152019

ISO-NE develops information resource on distributed generation interconnection for state officials, developers, and other stakeholders  

The New England states are promoting the development of distributed generation (DG) through a variety of policy initiatives, including feed-in tariffs, net energy metering, Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) requirements, and other renewable energy credit (REC) programs. DG is electricity provided by relatively small installations that are directly connected to retail distribution or customer facilities—not the high-voltage transmission system. An example would be a photovoltaic (PV) system (i.e., solar panels) installed on-site by a homeowner or business. These installations are not directly visible to or controllable by ISO New England system operators, but they do reduce the overall system load observed by the ISO.

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Tuesday
Oct082019

Monthly wholesale electricity prices and demand in New England, August 2019

Real-time prices lowest for August since at least 2003, ninth-lowest month overall

Average wholesale power prices in August 2019 were down 39.8% in the Real-Time Energy Market when compared to the previous year, falling to $23.58 per megawatt-hour (MWh)*. These prices mark the ninth-lowest average for any month since March 2003, when the region’s current markets launched, and the lowest of any August in that time. Prices were also down by 34.4% in the Day-Ahead Energy Market when compared to August 2019, averaging $25.69/MWh.

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Tuesday
Oct082019

New! FCM Substitution Auction self-paced training

ISO New England is pleased to announce the release of a new FCM Substitution Auction self-paced training. The training provides a review of the design objectives of the substitution auction and the various qualification deadlines that are required. It also covers the bids and offers component and the mechanics of how these bids and offers clear in the substitution auction. Viewing time is 26 minutes. Email the training team at MkTraining@iso-ne.com.

Thursday
Oct032019

Interconnecting step-by-step

ISO-NE launches online how-to guide for interconnecting generators and elective transmission upgrades to the New England power system

As a Regional Transmission Organization, the ISO coordinates how transmission lines, power plants, and other resources connect to and operate on New England’s administered transmission system to ensure reliability and facilitate wholesale electricity market participation. With lots of moving pieces, the process to interconnect to the system can be daunting for prospective interconnection customers (ICs) needing to dive in for the first time. To make the process more understandable, the ISO has launched a concise web-based Interconnection Process Guide.

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Thursday
Oct032019

2020 Annual Work Plan outlines major ISO-NE priorities and activities for coming year

ISO New England’s 2020 Annual Work Plan is now online. The work plan, published each September and updated each spring, outlines major priorities and activities for the year that are designed to improve upon existing ISO systems, practices, and services to New England. The 2020 work plan is primarily focused on developing a market-based solution to improve the region’s energy-security needs, continued enhancement of ISO cybersecurity systems, and assessing the ISO's first Order 1000 competitive transmission proposals. The ISO seeks stakeholder input on its work plan by sharing and discussing it with the Participants Committee. Ultimately, the work plan helps inform the ISO’s annual budget. For updates on markets projects, see the Wholesale Markets Project Plan page.

Wednesday
Oct022019

Greening the grid: New England’s technology-neutral wholesale electricity markets have led to cleaner, lower-cost power for the region

ISO-NE continues to develop solutions that help the New England states achieve their clean energy goal while keeping the markets competitive

Addressing climate change is a top priority for the New England states, and the issues at play are complex. Recently, a lot of activity and conversation has emerged on what ISO New England’s role should be in helping the states fulfill their clean energy policies. Numerous parties are involved in these discussions—many who are not familiar with the ISO—and occasionally our role is misunderstood. It is important to remember that ISO New England does not set policy and does not control the mix of resources being developed in the region.

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