Entries in weather (2)

Friday
Jun092017

Significant price variation on May 18 highlights operational challenges of operating the grid during spring and fall

Real-time prices ranged from a high of $758.88 MWh in the northeastern Massachusetts and Boston pricing zone to a low of -$71.07 MWh price for power from New Brunswick

Thursday, May 18, 2017, was a hot one. If you have an interest in energy, you may have checked the New England locational marginal pricing (LMP) map that day, expecting to see prices rise across the region, responding to the hotter than normal weather. Instead, you saw an unusual, rainbow-like effect on the map, indicating a wide variation in real-time wholesale electricity prices. The real-time price spread was caused by challenging power grid circumstances that can occur mainly during spring and fall (but also any time of year, depending on resource availability): when unseasonable weather drives a spike in demand while major energy infrastructure is offline for maintenance.

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Thursday
Dec152016

One factor rises above the rest when accurately predicting future energy use: the weather

How the ISO uses weather forecasts in formulating electric demand estimates

Earlier this summer, on July 7, 2016, a cold front moved into New England from the north, leading to unexpectedly cooler temperatures across the region. Boston hovered in the mid-60s for most of the day. An unanticipated thunderstorm in Hartford  caused a quick and dramatic drop in temperatures. The cool weather lasted through July 8.

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