Entries in system operations (39)

Tuesday
Aug132013

Ten years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout, much has changed

August 14, 2013, marks the ten-year anniversary of one of the most notable dates in the history of power system operations: the 2003 Northeast Blackout. On this day, more than 50 million people in the US and Canada lost power—and it all happened in a matter of seconds.

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Thursday
Jul252013

Heat wave pushes New England electricity use to highest peak this year

Sweltering temperatures and high humidity from July 14 through July 20 sent electricity demand soaring and set some new records for power use. At the onset of the week, ISO system operators forecasted very high demand for electricity—the highest of the season—and tight power system conditions were expected throughout the week.

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Monday
Jul012013

ISO-NE summarizes factors that contribute to curtailment of wind power during grid operations

Over the past five years, the amount of wind power connected to the New England high-voltage power grid has grown rapidly—from approximately two megawatts (MW) in 2005 to more than 700 MW today. Another 2,000+ MW of wind generation has been proposed for the region. Rapidly evolving technology, public policy goals and requirements, and government programs such as the federal Production Tax Credit (PTC) are all contributing to rising wind energy development. The growth of this resource adds to the region’s generation portfolio and can also help meet state renewable energy goals. At the same time, it is also adding new and complex challenges to managing the New England power grid.

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Tuesday
Jun182013

ISO-NE now publishing seven-day wind power forecast

Currently, about 700 megawatts (MW) of wind power generation are connected to the New England electric grid. An additional 2,800 MW of wind power are in the ISO’s generation interconnection queue, representing nearly 40% of all generation projects being proposed for development in the region. The ISO is taking steps to prepare for managing the grid with an increasing amount of this resource, which has operating characteristics different from traditional resources in that the fuel—wind—is available intermittently. One major initiative underway this year is the development of a centralized wind power forecast. In May, the ISO began publishing a seven-day wind forecast for New England. Each weekday, a CSV file is made available on the ISO website that provides an aggregate wind power projection for each hour for the next seven days. The forecast is still under development and is posted for informational purposes only; the full, final forecast should be operational before the end of 2013. The forecast is already providing useful data on the expected output of wind power resources in the region.

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Wednesday
Mar272013

New England grid operated reliably through 2012/2013 winter despite resource performance challenges 

Two weather-driven events exemplified concerns identified through the Strategic Planning Initiative

Although this winter didn’t prove to be the coldest or stormiest on record, New England endured a one-two punch with a stretch of frigid temperatures in January and then Winter Storm Nemo in February that caused generator, transmission, and distribution system outages. While the ISO was able to maintain reliability throughout these weather events, operators faced significant challenges managing the system with generating resources that were at risk of not being able to produce electricity when and as needed.  

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Wednesday
Oct312012

New England grid operations through Hurricane Sandy; preparation and communication key 

On October 29, 2012—exactly a year to the day after an unprecedented snow storm hit New England—Hurricane Sandy pummeled the region, giving folks yet another reminder that severe weather can strike at any time. Hurricane Sandy showed little mercy, with reports of wind gusts in some areas of New England reaching 70+ miles per hour and driving rain that caused flooding and record ocean storm surges. Widespread and scattered power outages affected all six states, but the majority of outages were in low-lying and coastal areas of New England, including the Connecticut shoreline, parts of Rhode Island, and eastern Massachusetts. The total number of customers without power at the peak late Monday night was estimated to be more than 1.3 million. At the time of this article’s publication, two days after the storm, about 610,000 customers remain without power.

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