Entries in system operations (38)

Thursday
May292014

SPI News: One year after shift in Day-Ahead Energy Market timeline, ISO-NE reports positive results to FERC

Just over a year ago, changes accelerating the Day-Ahead Energy Market (DAM) and Reserve Adequacy Analysis (RAA) timelines went into effect in New England. ISO New England and NEPOOL proposed the revisions in an effort to better align the timing of the region’s wholesale electricity and natural gas markets with the goal of improved reliability of the New England power grid. In an order accepting an acceleration of the timelines, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission also directed the ISO to submit a report on the impact the changes have had on operations one year after they went into effect. On May 23, the ISO published an Informational Report finding that the modifications have incrementally improved gas-electric coordination.

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Friday
Apr042014

Oil inventory was key in maintaining power system reliability through colder-than-normal weather during winter 2013/2014

The frigid temperatures that gripped much of the nation this winter posed operational challenges to the New England power grid, led to spikes in natural gas and wholesale electricity prices, and further highlighted issues related to resource performance and the importance of a secure fuel supply. In light of these challenges, here and across the country, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) hosted a Technical Conference on April 1, to hear from ISO New England, New York ISO, PJM Interconnection, Southwest Power Pool, Midcontinent ISO, California ISO, and other industry representatives about the impact of the cold weather on power system operations in different parts of the country.

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Tuesday
Apr012014

New wind power forecast integrated into ISO-NE processes and control room operations 

More precise information about the predicted electricity output from  wind resources improves dispatch efficiency, helps optimize power output from wind generators

Over the past several years, the amount of wind power connected to the New England high-voltage power grid has increased at a fairly quick pace—from approximately two megawatts (MW) in 2005 to more than 700 MW on the system today. Another 2,000 MW of wind generation has been proposed in the region.

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Wednesday
Jan222014

SPI News: ISO-NE submits proposal to strengthen performance incentives in New England’s Forward Capacity Market

Resource performance concerns driving FCM redesign

ISO New England submitted a proposal to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on Friday, January 17, 2014, that provides stronger incentives for resources to undertake investments that ensure they can perform when the power grid is stressed. These changes to key elements of the Forward Capacity Market (FCM) are needed to address significant risks to the continued reliability of the region’s power grid.

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Tuesday
Sep172013

Growth in solar energy means changes for power grid planning, operations

Solar energy has become one of the fastest growing types of electricity generation in New England. Based on ISO New England and available state data, more than 250 megawatts (MW) of solar photovoltaic (PV) resources were installed by the end of 2012—and approximately half of that was in 2012 alone. While this is still a relatively small amount—many conventional power plants in New England are larger than this aggregate capacity—the mounting volume and pace of solar development has prompted ISO New England to ratchet up its efforts to understand the impact this resource and other distributed generation (DG) technologies, such as cogeneration, biomass, and wind turbines, will have on the regional grid.

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Tuesday
Aug132013

Ten years after the 2003 Northeast Blackout, much has changed

August 14, 2013, marks the ten-year anniversary of one of the most notable dates in the history of power system operations: the 2003 Northeast Blackout. On this day, more than 50 million people in the US and Canada lost power—and it all happened in a matter of seconds.

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