Entries in system operations (55)

Wednesday
Mar062019

ISO-NE publishes 2019 Regional Electricity Outlook 

ISO New England has published its 2019 Regional Electricity Outlook (REO), an annual report looking at the trends affecting New England’s power system and the innovative solutions the ISO is pursuing to ensure reliable electricity for the region’s homes and businesses—today and into the future. New England’s traditional power grid is rapidly becoming a hybrid system where electricity needs will be met by conventional resources and significant amounts of large-scale renewable resources connected to the regional transmission system, in combination with thousands of small resources connected directly to retail customers or local distribution utilities. The report describes how the ISO is working to solve the operational and market challenges that emerge during this major transformation. The 2019 REO is available at www.iso-ne.com/reo.

Friday
Feb012019

Powering (another) Patriots Super Bowl!

The New England Patriots being in the Super Bowl has become routine around these parts, and so have the patterns of demand on the region’s electric grid during the big game.

Over the past several years, ISO New England has reported on the way the Super Bowl affects the way New Englanders use energy, with last year’s battle between the Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles no exception. All the tell-tale signs of a Super Bowl were there – the slight jumps in demand during commercial breaks, the spike at halftime and a slight bump at the end, as party-goers returned home.

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Wednesday
Dec122018

Argonne National Laboratory helps ISO-NE system operators prepare for impacts of major winter storm 

A “classic” Nor’easter can be anything but routine to the power grid

Nor’easters are a trademark of New England winters but the timing, intensity, and impact of such storms are far from predictable. ISO system operators must be prepared to operate the grid through a wide variety of wintertime scenarios.

This year, scientists from the Argonne National Laboratory studied previous Nor’easters and provided the ISO with a detailed analysis of the potential effects a major winter storm could have on the New England power system.

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Monday
Dec102018

A different kind of holiday: Thanksgiving grid demand peaks in the afternoon

For the first time since at least 2000, and possibly ever, Thanksgiving didn’t see its usual morning peak for grid demand this year. The change wasn’t caused by New Englanders suddenly deciding to change their cooking habits, but rather the further influence of solar power in the region.

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Wednesday
Nov282018

2018/2019 winter outlook: New England expected to have adequate resources 

ISO New England has implemented near-term changes based on lessons learned from historic cold snap

ISO New England, operator of New England’s power system, expects the region to have the necessary resources this winter to meet consumer demand, which is expected to peak at 20,357 megawatts (MW) under normal weather conditions or 21,057 MW at extreme temperatures.

However, as seen during last year’s two-week cold snap, power system operations could become challenging if demand is higher than projected, if the region loses a large generator, electricity imports are affected, or during periods of fuel delivery constraints. In those instances, the ISO could be required to implement emergency operating procedures to maintain reliability.

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Wednesday
Nov212018

As ovens heat up on Thanksgiving Day, so does electricity demand

Every year, the ISO publishes the story below on the uniqueness of the Thanksgiving Day demand curve and how electricity use coincides with oven use and TV watching. But this Thanksgiving is expected to be anything but “traditional.” Expected cold temperatures are resulting in a weather forecast that would even be daunting for a typical January. Temperatures across the region are expected to approach and/or break record cold highs and lows, dating back as far as 1901. Here’s what we’re expecting (as of Nov. 21) for electricity demand compared to what was consumed last year:

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