Entries in system operations (48)

Thursday
May032018

A regional first: New Englanders used less grid electricity midday than while they were sleeping on April 21

Solar power also pushes past 2,300 megawatts (MW) for first time

On Saturday, April 21, 2018, the right combination of sunshine and mild weather led to light consumer demand on the high-voltage electric power system, coupled with record-high output from the more than 130,000 solar power installations in the region. The result was that midday grid demand dipped below overnight demand for the first time ever in New England.

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Tuesday
May012018

Summer 2018 outlook: adequate electricity supplies expected

Under normal weather conditions, New England is expected to have sufficient resources to meet peak consumer demand for electricity this summer, according to ISO New England. Tight supply margins could develop if forecasted peak system conditions associated with extreme hot and humid weather occur. If this happens, ISO New England will take steps to manage New England’s electricity supply and demand and maintain power system reliability. View the press release.

Wednesday
Apr252018

Winter 2017/2018 recap: Historic cold snap reinforces findings in Operational Fuel-Security Analysis

Weather always plays a crucial role in how ISO New England operates the region's power grid, and that was certainly the case as New England faced a historic two-week cold snap in late December and early January that sent temperatures plunging and nearly pushed the bulk power system to the brink.

"The cold temperatures, together with winter storms and other complicating factors, led to some of the most challenging conditions our system operators have ever had to navigate," said Peter Brandien, ISO New England's vice president for system operations.

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Monday
Mar192018

Staying a Step Ahead: A look inside ISO-NE and the region’s changing power system

Have you ever wondered what it’s like in ISO New England’s control room? Or how the ISO fits into the region’s energy landscape? Staying a Step Ahead, released March 19, takes you inside the ISO, showcasing how the grid operator keeps the lights on across New England – today and in the future. Shot at the ISO offices and throughout New England, the video looks at the transformation occurring in New England, as the region transitions from a grid powered by oil and coal plants to one more reliant on renewable energy.

Learn more about the ISO’s three critical roles, and read about New England’s power system in the 2018 Regional Electricity Outlook.

Wednesday
Feb142018

ISO-NE publishes 2018 Regional Electricity Outlook 

ISO New England has published its 2018 Regional Electricity Outlook (REO), an annual report looking at the trends and challenges affecting New England’s power system, as well as the innovative solutions the ISO is pursuing to ensure reliable electricity for the region’s homes and businesses—today and into the future. The report describes changes to the region’s electric grid over the past two decades, and how the ISO is working to keep New England on the cutting edge as the region’s electricity industry rapidly evolves towards a future of renewable and natural gas resources.

The 2018 REO, as well as webpages that highlight and expand on information and statistics in the report, are available at www.iso-ne.com/reo.

Thursday
Feb012018

Powering to the finish: The ups and downs of electricity demand during a Patriots Super Bowl 

What happens when the New England Patriots stage a dramatic Super Bowl comeback, erasing a 28-3 deficit and forcing overtime? Residents across the region keep their televisions on, eager to catch a glimpse of the Patriot’s latest historic victory.

During the Patriots’ fifth Super Bowl win last year, ISO New England system operators saw demand on the region’s electric grid—which had been gradually declining through the night—suddenly level off and even inch back up as the game moved into overtime. At times, demand increased by as much as 50 megawatts during overtime.

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