Entries in peak demand (13)

Thursday
Dec152016

One factor rises above the rest when accurately predicting future energy use: the weather

How the ISO uses weather forecasts in formulating electric demand estimates

Earlier this summer, on July 7, 2016, a cold front moved into New England from the north, leading to unexpectedly cooler temperatures across the region. Boston hovered in the mid-60s for most of the day. An unanticipated thunderstorm in Hartford  caused a quick and dramatic drop in temperatures. The cool weather lasted through July 8.

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Monday
Dec052016

2016/2017 winter outlook: sufficient electricity supplies expected

Natural gas pipeline constraints remain a concern, Winter Reliability Program implemented

Electricity supplies should be sufficient to meet New England’s consumer demand for electricity this winter, but possible natural gas pipeline constraints could limit electricity production from natural gas power plants. A Winter Reliability Program has been implemented to incentivize gas and oil-fired power plants to procure sufficient fuel before winter begins. View the press release.

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Wednesday
Oct192016

Summer 2016 recap: Uneventful, until August

Summer 2016 was fairly uneventful until August arrived with its long stretches of hot, humid weather that pushed up demand for air conditioning and the electricity that powers it. Despite a high number of unexpected resource outages on one August day, ISO New England’s control room operators were able to operate the power system reliably that day and throughout the summer.

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Tuesday
Apr262016

2016 summer outlook: sufficient electricity supplies expected

Some natural gas generators may need to get their fuel from other sources during pipeline construction

Under normal weather conditions of 90 degrees Fahrenheit (F), electricity resources should be sufficient to meet consumer demand this summer, with a forecasted peak of 26,704 MW megawatts (MW). Extreme weather of 94°F could push up electricity demand to 29,042 MW. Construction work on the region’s natural gas pipeline infrastructure will require some power plants to obtain fuel from different sources. View the press release.

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Thursday
Apr212016

Winter 2015/2016 recap: New England power system performed well and prices remained low

Compared to winters past, the winter of 2015-2016 featured above-average temperatures and a brief cold snap in February. Many in the region have called it the “the winter that wasn’t.”

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), this winter was the warmest on record in the US. The average temperature in the lower 48 states was 36.8°F, which is 4.6°F above the 20th-century average. That beats the previous record of 36.5 degrees set in the winter of 1999-2000.

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Tuesday
Apr072015

New England power system performed well through winter 2014/2015

Now that the winter of 2014/2015 is one for the history books, this much we know is certain: no two New England winters are alike. A confluence of regional and global factors, advance planning and preparations, and delayed cold weather during winter 2014/2015 helped alleviate the operational issues and record-high prices seen during the previous winter.

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