Entries in peak demand (14)

Wednesday
May152019

ISO-NE expects sufficient power supplies this summer

New England is expected to have sufficient resources to meet peak consumer demand for electricity this summer under both typical and extreme weather conditions.

ISO New England prepares short-term forecasts for the summer and winter seasons, taking into account estimated contributions from all resources, including those with and without an obligation through the capacity market to supply electricity; unplanned resource outages; imports from neighboring regions; and resource additions and retirements. These estimates help inform ISO New England’s planning on how to operate the grid during the upcoming peak season.

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Monday
Dec102018

A different kind of holiday: Thanksgiving grid demand peaks in the afternoon

For the first time since at least 2000, and possibly ever, Thanksgiving didn’t see its usual morning peak for grid demand this year. The change wasn’t caused by New Englanders suddenly deciding to change their cooking habits, but rather the further influence of solar power in the region.

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Wednesday
Nov282018

2018/2019 winter outlook: New England expected to have adequate resources 

ISO New England has implemented near-term changes based on lessons learned from historic cold snap

ISO New England, operator of New England’s power system, expects the region to have the necessary resources this winter to meet consumer demand, which is expected to peak at 20,357 megawatts (MW) under normal weather conditions or 21,057 MW at extreme temperatures.

However, as seen during last year’s two-week cold snap, power system operations could become challenging if demand is higher than projected, if the region loses a large generator, electricity imports are affected, or during periods of fuel delivery constraints. In those instances, the ISO could be required to implement emergency operating procedures to maintain reliability.

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Wednesday
Nov212018

As ovens heat up on Thanksgiving Day, so does electricity demand

Every year, the ISO publishes the story below on the uniqueness of the Thanksgiving Day demand curve and how electricity use coincides with oven use and TV watching. But this Thanksgiving is expected to be anything but “traditional.” Expected cold temperatures are resulting in a weather forecast that would even be daunting for a typical January. Temperatures across the region are expected to approach and/or break record cold highs and lows, dating back as far as 1901. Here’s what we’re expecting (as of Nov. 21) for electricity demand compared to what was consumed last year:

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Thursday
Oct112018

Summer 2018: Air conditioners get a workout 

Operating the region’s power system changes with the seasons. New England is a summer-peaking system, but summer 2018 was marked by spells of hot and humid weather that drove consumer demand to peaks not seen in years and tested power system operations. Reliable grid operations were maintained throughout a summer that was bookended by holiday weather events: a heat wave in early July and an extremely hot and sticky Labor Day weekend.

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Wednesday
Jun062018

Price-responsive demand explained: Q&A with Henry Yoshimura, ISO Director of Demand Resource Strategy

6/12/18 update: Expanded information on pay-for-performance's impact on demand resources.

On June 1, 2018, ISO New England launched a new price-responsive demand (PRD) structure that completes the full integration of active demand resources (also known as demand response) into the regional wholesale electricity marketplace. Building on demand resources’ long-standing ability to participate in the capacity market, PRD makes ISO New England the first US grid operator to deploy its active demand resources as part of the energy dispatch and reserve-designation process along with generating resources. Henry Yoshimura, the ISO’s Director of Demand Resource Strategy, explains PRD below, as well as the changes and benefits it brings.

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